New Season, New Face, New Floors

Happy allergy season, everyone! It’s not that I’m complaining about the warm weather – that would be inappropriate, given the plight of my family up north – but the flowers are FILLING my sinuses, and it’s a little unpleasant. If you need me, I’ll be hiding inside, clutching my bottle of Zyrtec.

This season is happy, though, because I feel like a new woman. After years of complaining, we finally replaced our gross carpet and tile with engineered hardwoods!

You may recall that it used to look like this:
Colorful living room and dining room via Glitter and Goat Cheese

And now it looks like THIS:
Stephanie Shore Fisher's living room with new hardwood floors and Lulu & Georgia Lalita rug (via Glitter and Goat Cheese)

I swear, a choir of angels bursts into jubilant song every time I walk into my house. We haven’t put the baseboards back in yet, so I’m waiting to write a full post until that’s done, but I just couldn’t resist sharing now. They look SO. GOOD. By the way, it’s obvious that when I say “we put in hardwoods” and “we need to put in the baseboards,” I mean my husband, right? Speaking of angels – that man is such a dreamboat.

So, beyond the new floors, I also feel like a new woman because I have a new eye! Or, a new eyelid, anyway. Remember the droopy eyelid (ptosis) I mentioned here? I got the repair surgery last month! Because before-and-afters are fun, here’s an extremely grainy and unflattering selfie from before Christmas (I CANNOT BELIEVE I’M POSTING THIS HORROR) and a more flattering selfie from last week:

Before:
Droopy right eyelid before ptosis surgery (via Glitter and Goat Cheese)

After:
Stephanie Shore Fisher with a blunt bob (via Glitter and Goat Cheese)

The ptosis was MUCH more noticeable in person, but it’s still a pretty big difference, right? The after photo also displays my new blunt bob, and my newly grown-in and reshaped eyebrows (thanks to LiBrow and Alyson Howard-Hoag)! Like I said – new woman.

Oh, and I can’t forget – drumroll, please – my new purse:
See by Chloe Vicki Small Bucket Bag in Black (via Glitter and Goat Cheese)

Isn’t she gorgeous? It’s the small Vicki bucket bag by See by Chloe, and I got it during a double-sale at Bloomingdale’s. I always get a little panicky after a semi-large purchase, but I’m a carry-the-same-bag-every-day-all-year-long kind of gal, so it makes sense for me to invest in a quality piece. Plus, the scent of good leather makes me weak in the knees.

The littlest things can make such a big difference, and I’m feeling pretty good these days. I’m going for runs, washing my face every night, wearing heels … These things are all pretty good indicators of my emotional well-being. You guys must have things you only do when you’re in a good mental space, right? What are they?

Things are OK here in Atlanta, so we’re not in a massive rush to get up to New York, but we’d certainly like it to happen sooner rather than later. I’m still looking for a job, so if you know anyone in the entertainment or lifestyle industry who might want to hire a web editor/content manager, please send them my portfolio/resume site: stephanie-fisher.com. Alternatively, if you know of an opening for an audio engineer/sound editor, here’s Brad’s site: brad-fisher.com.

Ah! One more thing! I set up a Shop Glitter & Goat Cheese page with pictures of/links to all my favorite home, fashion and beauty products. Hope you’ll check it out!

Prewar in NYC: The Dream & the Design

When I dream of our possible future in Brooklyn, my dreams have a very specific aesthetic. Our home is a classic prewar brownstone, chock full of original details. The ceilings are high and the floorboards are wide. Light streams in through huge and plentiful windows. (Every room has a southern exposure, of course.) And our decor is an eclectic mix of mid-century lines, vintage accents and bold textiles.

You know – kind of like this.

The living room of Mike D's eclectic Brooklyn townhouse as featured in the New York Times
(Mike D’s Cobble Hill townhome via The New York Times)

I’m no fool. I know the hefty price tag a prewar brownstone commands, and I’m well aware that we’re more likely to end up in a dark, dank basement apartment. But that doesn’t mean a girl can’t dream.

Prewar, generally speaking, refers to apartment buildings built before World War II. If we’re being specific, anything built before World War I is pre-prewar, and buildings from before the Spanish-American war in 1898 are pre-pre-prewar. But when you take an overarching look at the architecture of New York living spaces from the 1850s to the 1940s, most of them share a few key characteristics.

The ornate, hand-carved moldings …

Kerri Russell 1860s Brooklyn townhome via Elle Decor
(Kerri Russell’s 1860s Brooklyn townhome via Elle Decor)

Bedroom in Hilary Robertson Brooklyn townhome
(Hilary Robertson’s Fort Greene townhome via The New York Times)

The sky-high ceilings …

Brooklyn Heights townhouse from Rum magazine via Dintelo
(A Brooklyn Heights townhome from RUM magazine, via Dintelo)

Michelle James 1890s Brooklyn brownstone via Remodelista
(Michelle James’ 1890s Brooklyn brownstone via Remodelista)

Manhattan brownstone by Jan Eleni Interiors
(A Manhattan brownstone by Jan Eleni Interiors)

Lena Corwin and Josh Dreier Fort Greene Italianate brownstone via Remodelista
(Lena Corwin and Josh Dreier’s late-1800s Fort Greene brownstone via Remodelista)

The massive windows …

Cobble Hill townhouse by Blair Harris Interior Design
(A Cobble Hill townhouse by Blair Harris Interior Design)

Hilary Robertson Brooklyn townhome
(Hilary Robertson‘s Brooklyn townhome again)

Christina and Simon Anderson 1890s Park Slope Victorian via The New York Times
(Christina and Simon Anderson’s 1890s Park Slope Victorian via The New York Times)

A marble mantelpiece with an arched antique mirror over it is basically my dream.

Ali Cayne Greenwich Village townhouse via Domino
(Ali Cayne’s Greenwich Village townhouse via Domino)

Throw in a crystal chandelier, and I’m in heaven.

Ali Cayne Greenwich Village townhouse with chandelier via Domino
(Ali Cayne’s townhouse via Domino again)

19th-century Park Slope brownstone by Roman and Williams via 6sqft
(19th-century Park Slope townhouse by Roman and Williams / photo via 6sqft)

In the absence of a massive mirror, a single piece of large-scale art can work, too.

Francesa Connolly 1890s Brooklyn brownstone via Elle Decor
(Remodelista‘s Francesca Connolly’s 1890s Brooklyn brownstone via Elle Decor)

Elspeth Benoit and David Bevan 1870s Cobble Hill townhouse
(Elspeth Benoit and David Bevan’s 1870s Cobble Hill townhouse via The New York Times

And don’t forget those solid wood floors.

Mike D Cobble Hill townhouse via The New York TImes
(Mike D’s townhouse again)

Fine. I’ll settle for parquet.

Boerum Hill apartment via Airbnb
(Daniel Kanter‘s 1890 Boerum Hill apartment – you can stay in this one!)

Brooklyn Heights townhouse dining room from Rum magazine via Dintelo
(Brooklyn Heights townhouse via Dintelo again)

Photo overload, I know. I’m sorry. I just can’t get enough. If you can’t either, you should check out my prewar Pinterest board.

So, what do you think? I’m betting you wouldn’t kick one of these brownstones out of bed, either. Anyone want to lend me a few million dollars?

Listen: “By My Side” by Great Good Fine OK

Happy Wednesday! Just stopping by to suggest that you listen to this song immediately:

The whole EP (Body Diamond) is super fun and dancey but also somehow gives me an embarrassing lump in my throat. Kind of a rare and excellent combo, if you ask me.

I found the album after hearing “You’re the One for Me” on the Cougar Town Season 6 premiere (Tuesdays at 10:30/9:30c on TBS!*). A little known fact: Christa Miller, who plays Ellie on the show, is also the music supervisor, and she’s really good at it. The last song in the episode is almost always something new and stellar. Case in point: She used “Forever” by Haim back in Season 4, several months before they starting blowing up and about eight months before that um, interesting Saturday Night Live performance. And last night’s episode featured a brand new never-heard-before song by Ed Sheeran.

Another little known fact: In college, I majored in journalism and minored in music because I was fairly certain I was going to be a music critic. Obviously, that didn’t happen, but it’s still kind of weird that I never talk about music on my blog. I think I might start doing that occasionally, if y’all are interested.

Let me know if you like the song! OK, as you were.

*Though I currently work for TBS, all opinions on this blog have always been and will always be completely my own.

Glitter & Goat Cheese in 2014

IT’S OVER.

Well, folks, we survived 2014. I can’t say I’m sorry to see it go. There have certainly been some highlights and plenty of happy moments, but I think I’ve spent the majority of this year feeling a little uneasy. My resolution at the end of 2013 was to try and settle into my life – I’ve gone through a major change every single year since graduating college, and I figured it was about time to give it a rest – but I discovered an inability to do so. Brad and I can’t seem to settle into our life here in Atlanta because something just isn’t right, and that’s why I’m so happy that we’re planning to make this New York thing happen. I mean, who knows? Maybe that won’t be right either. But at least we’re trying.

Anyway, back to the highlights. I’d like to focus on the positive, and there was a lot of that. So, let’s look back at a few of my favorite blog posts from 2014.

The first big chunk of the year was completely consumed by the Home Depot Patio Style Challenge. Seriously, what an amazing experience. It was so much work, and at times we asked ourselves what the hell we’d gotten ourselves into, but every step of the process was incredibly rewarding. The finished product wasn’t too shabby, either.

Glitter and Goat Cheese - Newly updated and colorful deck and pergola for The Home Depot Patio Style Challenge
See the full source list here and all the process posts here.

Once that was done, we mostly sat around under the completed pergola and avoided our power tools. We were exhausted. But I did dive into my blog reader and Pinterest boards with a renewed sense of purpose, in hopes of finding inspiration for making the rest of our home as pretty as our deck. To keep our decor strategy cohesive, I wrote up a list of design preferences that felt like us.

Recently blog - entryway with fuchsia accents
(Photo via Recently) See the full post here.

Over the summer, I put the theory into practice by making some much-needed updates to our downstairs. True to my word, I incorporated warm woods, pops of color, brass accents, patterned rugs and rustic elements.

Colorful living room with Lulu and Georgia Lalita rug - via Glitter and Goat Cheese
See more angles of our living room and dining room in the full post.

Even after buying a few new pieces, I couldn’t stop daydreaming about things like cognac leather sofas and Saarinen side tables, so when Chairish asked me to e-design a room around one of their accent chairs, I jumped at the chance.

Mid-century eccentric living room inspired by Danish teak armchair from Chairish
Find all the sources here.

Shortly after writing that post, we started thinking about moving, so I put all home updates on hold. Pausing all my projects was tough, but it gave me time to focus on other areas and actually do some reading. I was intrigued (and kind of troubled) by all the press around a woman’s right to alter her appearance, and I wrote about my own struggles with self image.

Glitter and Goat Cheese - Hiding ptosis in selfies
Read the full post here.

My self-imposed DIY ban also gave me a lot of time to cook, so I shared a couple recipes, including one for my favorite kale salad.

Kale, chicken, bacon and Israeli couscous salad with lemon mustard vinaigrette (via Glitter and Goat Cheese)
Here’s the recipe! Oh, man, now I want to eat some.

Toward the end of the year, I got into creating curated lists, and my very favorite is a round-up of beautiful kitchens with mixed metals.

10 Kitchens that Prove Mixing Metals Is Totally OK (via Glitter and Goat Cheese)
Here’s the full post. Warning: envy-inducing pretty pictures ahead.

So, now it’s New Year’s Eve, and I’d be lying if I didn’t admit to a little trepidation at the year ahead. I’m hoping it’ll include a move up north, an influx of stable work for Brad, a new career for me and a renewed excitement for the path we’re on, but there’s a lot of potential for disappointment in those dreams. All we can do now is move forward with optimism and calculated care.

Tonight, we’ll celebrate the New Year with our best friends – for what could be the last time – and hope for the best.

What are your plans for New Year’s Eve? What about your hopes for 2015?

A Modern Classic: The Kartell Masters Chair

I have a Pinterest board called Furniture Design Classics where I collect photos of timeless furniture used in modern interiors. (You should go follow it, if you don’t already.)

One of my favorite pieces to pin is the Masters Chair, designed by Philippe Starck and Eugeni Quitllet for Kartell in 2010.

Kartell Masters Chair - via Glitter and Goat Cheese

Photo via DWR



The intersecting lines on the back echo the shape of three classics created by master designers who had come before Starck and Quitllet. (Hence the name.) From left to right: The Series 7 chair by Arne Jacobsen (1955), the Tulip Arm Chair by Eero Saarinen (1956) and the Molded Plastic Wire-Base Side Chair – also known as the Eiffel chair – by Charles and Ray Eames (1948).

Arne Jacobsen Series 7 Chair, Eero Saarinen Tulip Armchair and Charles Eames Eiffel Chair - via Glitter and Goat Cheese

Photos via Hive Modern, MoMA and DWR



Can you see the shapes?! I think the Masters Chair is particularly amazing because it’s so beautiful on its own but pays such clear homage to its three predecessors. And like so many modern chairs, it fits seamlessly into almost any interior.

I love to see that curvy, sexy back juxtaposed against a boxy, rectangular table:

Masters Chairs in Jodi and Brendan York's dining room via The Design Files. Photo by Sean Fennessy

Photo via The Design Files



But they’re also right at home on a stone patio with a round pedestal table:

Masters Chairs in Claudio Luti's home via Casa Vogue. Photo by

Photo via Casa Vogue


(Note the way the minty green of the chairs mimics the patina of aged metal. A clever color choice, here.)

And as you’d expect, they’re flawless with a tapered-leg mid-century shape, too.

Heals A/W 2012 collection with BAU pendant light, Zoffany Verdure wallpaper by Melissa White and Masters Chairs by Philippe Starck - via Glitter and Goat Cheese

Photo via Bodie and Fou



But let me tell you: for me, nothing beats this casually-placed gold Masters Chair in Lonny executive editor Irene Edwards’ living room.

Lonny executive editor Irene Edwards' living room with a gold Masters Chair - via Glitter and Goat Cheese

Photo via Lonny



The Kartell Metal collection was announced back in March, but this is the first time I’m seeing one of the metallic Masters Chairs in a room, and I am absolutely consumed with jealousy. They’re not available until early 2015, so Edwards is one lucky lady. (I wouldn’t mind getting my hands on her copper and leather Palermo Butterfly Chair, either.)

The chairs will come in gold, silver, gun-metal grey and copper, so let’s just go ahead and put the copper on my dream house wish list right now.

Kartell Metal Masters Chairs - via Glitter and Goat Cheese

Photo via Kartell



I’m not greedy. I just need one. I’ll put it at my desk, so I can pay bills and clip coupons while I sit in a metallic masterpiece. No big deal.

Which one would you pick? And where would you put it?

PS: I’ve been posting some of my old projects on Hometalk, with many more on the way. Come join me!