Silver-Tongued

I don’t know why, but all of a sudden, I really feel that I need a pair of silver oxfords. It’s not a logical desire, since we’re about to enter the six-month Georgia season in which wearing anything other than sandals is completely unbearable. But the heart wants what it wants.

Please view and admire my current favorites:

ASOS MUSTER Flatform Lace Up Shoes via Glitter and Goat Cheese
(ASOS)

Forever 21 Metallic Faux Patent Leather Oxfords via Glitter and Goat Cheese
(Forever 21)

ASOS KG by Kurt Geiger Ludo Silver Leather Cork Flat Shoes via Glitter and Goat Cheese
(ASOS)

Zara Metallic platform bluchers via Glitter and Goat Cheese
(Zara)

ASOS MARK IT UP Lace Up Shoes via Glitter and Goat Cheese
(ASOS)

I’m leaning very strongly toward the Zara pair, but the last ASOS pair is less than half the price and is also amazing. DECISIONS.

Which ones do you like best?

Also, on a separate shoe-related note: can those of us who lived through the ’90s please agree to categorically reject the return of the Teva? Please? I can’t do this again. I just can’t.

SHOP THE SHOES:

10 Kitchens That Prove Mixing Metals Is Totally OK

As we’ve been making minor updates to our home to make it more attractive to potential buyers, I’ve wrestled with whether to match our faucets to our light fixtures, our cabinet hardware to our doorknobs, etc. I’m a bit stuck between my own eclectic style and the more conservative look that Brookhaven buyers seems to favor.

There’s no question about where I fall in the mixed metals debate. I am all for it. The key, in my opinion, is to make it look deliberate. Your home shouldn’t look like you’ve been swapping out builder-grade features one at a time and haven’t gotten around to all of them. The goal is to create balance by juxtaposing styles and finishes that complement each other.

A note: Because many appliances don’t come in warm metals (and not everyone can afford a La Cornue range or cabinet-paneled pieces), I generally consider stainless steel appliances to be a neutral. There are some exceptions, but I say ignore ’em.

We’ve done some amateur metal-mixing in our home, but for a master class, check out these insanely beautiful kitchens:

10 Kitchens that Prove Mixing Metals Is Totally OK (via Glitter and Goat Cheese)

#1: Chrome, Antique Brass and Bronze
Modern kitchen with Hicks pendants in Rue Magazine (via Glitter and Goat Cheese)
With its glossy flat-front cabinets, contemporary chrome barstools, marble waterfall island and mirrored tile backsplash, this kitchen from Rue Magazine could have skewed toward cold and unwelcoming very easily. The antique silver pitcher and bronze/brass Hicks pendants add a lived-in touch. See a few different angles here.

#2: Brass, Bronze and Copper
Smitten Studio Brass and Copper Kitchen (via Glitter and Goat Cheese)
In designer Sarah Sherman Samuel’s recently updated kitchen, she used warm metals exclusively. Again, those and the rustic wood elements keep the mostly-white kitchen from feeling too cold and modern. See more photos here.

#3: Brass and Stainless Steel
Husman Hagberg Kitchen with Brass Accents and a Stainless Pot Rail (via Glitter and Goat Cheese)
With chalky-finish cabinets, subway tile and a farmhouse sink, the overall feel of this kitchen is heading toward country. The stainless steel pot rail (from Ikea!) gives it a utilitarian edge. Photo from HusmanHagberg, via Apartment Therapy.

#4: Silver and Wrought Iron
White and Wood Kitchen from House and Home (via Glitter and Goat Cheese)
Once more, we see a mix of modern finishes (glossy solid surface countertops, a chrome coil-spring faucet) and rustic elements (reclaimed wood shelves with wrought iron brackets, terra cotta pots, wood cutting board). Modern + rustic is one of my favorite kitchen combos. From House & Home’s June 2014 issue, found via SF Girl by Bay.

#5: Brass, Copper and Chrome
Brass, copper and chrome kitchen - photo by Aubrie Pick (via Glitter and Goat Cheese)
In contrast, if you want to mix several metals without losing cohesiveness, it helps to pick one style and stick with it. This kitchen, photographed by Aubrie Pick, uses modern fixtures across the board, which allows for some flexibility in finishes.

#6: Silver and Gold
Philadelphia Modern Bohemian Kitchen by Design Manifest (via Glitter and Goat Cheese)
Luckily for renters, light fixtures and hardware aren’t the only way to mix metals. If you’re dealing with generic builder-grade finishes, add a collected, custom vibe with gold-framed vintage art and a well-loved rug. See more of Naomi Stein’s Philadelphia loft (one of my all-time favorite homes, FWIW) here and here.

#7: Silver and Bronze
Bronze and silver kitchen by Benjamin Dhong Interior Design (via Glitter and Goat Cheese)
For those who think you can only mix warm with warm and cool with cool, I bring you this beautiful kitchen by Benjamin Dhong. The warm bronze cabinet hardware and sconce play well with the putty-colored cabinets and pops of yellow, but the big silver banded globe chandelier takes the otherwise-traditional kitchen to another level. The standout piece would have been a focal point in any finish, but the contrasting metal really draws your eye.

#8: Gold and Polished Silver
Farmhouse kitchen with gold chandelier from House Beautiful (via Glitter and Goat Cheese)
I absolutely love the bravery that Tobi Tobin employed when she updated her 100-year-old farmhouse’s kitchen. The high-gloss black cabinets modernize the room a bit, but the visible brush strokes keep things cozy. In this case, I think brass cabinet knobs would have taken away from the ornate gold and crystal chandelier. Using polished silver for the hardware and faucet is the perfect way to keep the eye where it belongs. See more at House Beautiful.

#9: Steel, Gold and Silver
Steel, brass and silver kitchen from Design*Sponge (via Glitter and Goat Cheese)
Technically, I think those pendants might be glass, but let’s call them gold for simplicity’s sake. In any case, you certainly wouldn’t expect to see them paired with industrial steel bar stools, but there they are, and I think they look fantastic. The flea market stools, glam pendants and brass deer head give a curated feel to what would otherwise be a pretty typical modern white kitchen. See more of the loft at Design*Sponge.

#10: Brass, Stainless Steel and Bronze
Gray and white kitchen with brass steel and bronze from House and Home (via Glitter and Goat Cheese)
There’s a lot going on in this kitchen: industrial stainless appliances, reclaimed wood shelves, brass bin pulls, a copper colander, a bronze pendant … And you can’t even see the two gold chandeliers over the table in this photo. Somehow, though, it all contributes to a lived-in bistro style that never feels schizophrenic. It helps that the decor is minimal: The shelves are sparsely-styled, there’s not much on the counters, and even the two patterned fabrics in the room (the roman shades, not pictured, and the rug) are tone-on-tone, close in shade to the lower cabinets. Makes you feel like you could pull off a kitchen with about seven different finishes, right? See more at House & Home.

So, what do you think? Would you try mixing metals in your home? What parameters would you use to keep things from looking crazy?